2001: The Year Professional Wrestling Died

The Worst Of WCW Volume 1 - Where The Big Boys Play


Available on:
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When 2001 began, there were three national wrestling companies, a weekly Monday night ratings battle, and a huge, ravenous fanbase of diehard wrestling fans. By the time the year was over, there was just one national wrestling company, fan interest had waned significantly, and the ratings began a steady decline that continues to this day.

What happened? How could a business that had enjoyed unprecedented success as a pop culture phenomenon in the late 90s and early 2000s have fallen so far in the span of twelve months? How did WCW and ECW, once highly regarded pro wrestling empires, become punchlines on WWE documentaries? And how did WWE, the company that did everything right during the Monday Night Wars, wind up doing everything wrong the instant they were over?

2001: The Year Professional Wrestling Died looks at how the entire wrestling industry collapsed overnight. It chronicles the deaths of both WCW and ECW, the poorly-run InVasion angle that followed, the criminal misuse of WCW and ECW’s wrestlers and legacies, and the ways in which the fallout from this catastrophic time still affect WWE and the wrestling business today.

The Most Offensive Storylines In WWE History

The Worst Of WCW Volume 1 - Where The Big Boys Play


Available THIS WEEKEND ONLY for $2.99 on Amazon!

WWE has always been willing to take risks and push the envelope to entertain its fans, and sometimes, things work out great and we end up with legendary superstars like Stone Cold Steve Austin, the Rock, and Degeneration X. Other times, things don’t go so well and WWE comes away looking incompetent at best and downright tasteless at worst.

The Most Offensive Storylines In WWE History looks at the absolute worst of the worst, the storylines that not only misfired on all cylinders, but made us embarrassed to be wrestling fans. Relive breathtakingly terrible storylines, such as…

-The Big Boss Man reveals that the Big Show is a bastard, then steals his dead father’s casket
-Muhammad Hassan: All-American homegrown terrorist
-Vince McMahon vs God
-Dominick On A Pole
-Dawn Marie kills Torrie Wilson’s dad with her overactive sex drive
-Billy & Chuck: GLAAD’s (former) favorite tag team
-And much more!

This book also contains the following complete bonus titles:
-Wrestling History Revisited: Rewriting The HDNet Era of Ring of Honor
-Pro Wrestling Stars of the 90s Volume 3: Yokozuna
-Make Up Your Mind: The Wrestlers With The Most Bsbyface/Heel Turns

The Most Offensive Storylines In WWE History is available THIS WEEKEND ONLY for $2.99 on Amazon!

You Can’t See Them: People John Cena Shouldn’t Have Destroyed (But Did)

The Worst Of WCW Volume 1 - Where The Big Boys Play


Available on:
Amazon
Google Play
Nook

A lot of things can be said about John Cena, but “he’s helped other people become stars by losing at times when it would really matter” is not one of them. To the detriment of nearly everyone else on that roster since he claimed his first WWE World Title in 2005, Cena has not only beaten one would-be superstar after another, but done so in such convincing fashion that he pretty much destroyed any credibility they had coming into the match. Even on the rare occasions he does lose, he will then win the next two or three rematches, often against his conqueror and a couple of cronies.

Almost nobody has come out of a feud with Cena looking better, or even as good, as they did going in. This book tells the stories of the ones that really hurt, the guys who really could have meant something if they hadn’t been fed to the wood chipper called John Cena. Over the course of these chapters, you’ll get to relive every minute of the decade of frustration we saw John Cena tear through everyone thrown in his path, and think about what might have been.

This book includes the following bonus feature:
-The Few, The Proud: The Men John Cena Actually Put Over Strong

The Worst Of WCW Volume 1: Where The Big Boys Play

The Worst Of WCW Volume 1 - Where The Big Boys Play


Available on:
Amazon
Google Play
Nook

Despite being regarded for many years as one of the best wrestling territories in the country and a key member of the National Wrestling Alliance, Jim Crockett Promotions hit hard times in the late 80s. With no apparent way to dig themselves out of their hole, the company was sold to Turner Broadcasting in late 1988 and transformed into World Championship Wrestling.

To say the corporate culture at Turner had a hard time meshing with the old-school wrestling mentality of Jim Crockett Promotions would be an understatement. By the time the 90s began, WCW had morphed into a second-rate WWF sports entertainment knockoff, and was barely recognizable as the deep-rooted wrestling company it had been only a few years earlier.

The revolving door of executives with no experience in (or mind for) the wrestling business did everything they could to try and emulate the entertainment aspects of the WWF, but as this book details, the results were somewhat less than inspiring.

Bonus features in this book include:
-WCW In The Early 90s: The Supporting Cast
-The Most Controversial NWA World Title Changes
-The Five Biggest “Only In WCW” Moments Of The Early 90s